Tag Archives: ontario

Movement tip: Isometric Straight Leg Raise Adduction

In the past I’ve mentioned how I’ve felt that the hip adductors seemed to have been a little neglected with the glute focus that’s been so prevalent in the past few years.  I’m happy to see a lot of higher profile “guru’s” starting to bring them back into the fold again due to their importance in core, pelvic and knee stability.

If we look at their functional anatomy we can see that they play a huge role in core and pelvic stability.  In my experience I’ve found that many patients with deep core dysfunction also have dysfunction with their hip adductors or vice versa.  If you follow the deep front net of Thomas Myers Anatomy Trains, this makes sense as you can see how these structures are interwoven with one another.

In my practice I’ve found a lot of people unable to coordinate this sling which leaves them very vulnerable to back strains or more serious injuries.  In working with a soccer team over the winter months (who won a tournament in Italy in the Spring.  So proud of them!), my colleague and I noticed many of them were giving up a lot of power due to this instability.  This movement prep exercise was discovered to try and help them connect and strengthen this line.  I’ve found it to be quite effective with most populations.  It requires the deep core and hip adductors to work together creating that link.  Give it a try!

Isometric Supine Straight Leg Raise Adduction

  • Attach a large O-band to a secure anchor about knee to mid-thigh height.
  • Lie on your back with body parallel to anchor placing feet inline with the anchor point.
  • Position yourself away from the anchor point at a distance that will provide a challenging tension for you.
  • Loop the O-band around the mid-foot portion of your inside leg.
  • With the band under tension, clamp your body into the ground maintaining a neutral spine.
  • Use your hamstrings and glutes of the outside leg to squeeze into the ground and anchor your sacrum and hips keeping them square with shoulders throughout.  Lock down this position.
  • Ensure that rib cage does not rotate or glide laterally out of alignment with hips.  These are common errors.
  • Start movement by raising inside leg up to about 30-45 degree angle and squeeze in toward mid line of body keeping leg straight with knee and toes point up toward ceiling. Hold contraction for specified time.
  • Slowly release but do not let leg drop before repeating next repetition.

Suggested variables: 

2-3 sets, 4-6 reps of 5-10 second holds per side.

Structural Balance: Why it’s important

The majority of the injuries that I see with my patients are usually the result of some form of structural imbalance.  What do I mean by this?  Let me try to explain… 

Our bodies are designed in such a way that everything is interwoven and in a pre-tensioned state.  When everything is balanced as it should be, we are able to adapt to and withstand different ranges of internal or external forces.  This is what makes our bodies so resilient.  To give you an idea of how this works, Fascial Stretch Therapy founders Chris and Anne Frederick often use the example of a geodesic dome (think of a dome tent).  When the poles and tent fabric are placed together and under balanced tension, you have a durable attenuating structure.  By themselves, the fabric or poles wouldn’t be able to stand erect with integrity if at all.  The term tensegrity is used to describe this sort of structural phenomenon. 

So, we have bones which act similar to the poles of the tent, and soft tissues such as fascia, muscles, ligaments, etc. that are like the fabric.  If any of the soft tissues are tensioned more or less than they should be, the entire structure will be unbalanced and compromised. 

Of course we can still function, but not optimally and usually at the expense of an area of our body that is compensating for this imbalance.  You can drive a car that’s slightly off alignment for quite some time, but more wear is put on the tires and they will need to be changed much faster than if the car were aligned properly.  Sometimes that extra wear might result in a premature flat.  Often times our joints are like the tires of a misaligned vehicle.  This is why I am so keen on structural balance as it can provide a solution or prevention to many of the ailments we experience.

I hope this simplified video explanation of tensegrity helps!

Simplified tensegrity/structural balance explanation.