Tag Archives: lats

Movement Tip: Isometric Low Range Squat

Isometrics can be a great way to strengthen weaknesses throughout a range of motion in a movement.

In this example I’m using an assisted low range isometric squat, but you can take the principle and apply it to anything.  Use that pause to connect with your muscles and feel what’s working, what’s not, what should be.  Take the time while in that pause to figure it out and get everything responding the way it should be and then groove it proper.  You’re only as strong as your weakest link, so find it and strengthen it.

I’ll typically start people between 2-3 sets of 3-6 reps with 5-6 second pauses per rep.  I like this for slowing down mechanics and working on grooving proper patterns.

I’ve found this exercise to be an excellent way to get people comfortable with the bottom position of a squat. (Note:  Make sure the range of motion is there first.)

Movement Tip: The Banana Stretch

Most of us are one-side dominant in our daily activities.  We typically open doors, carry groceries, get in and out of vehicles more frequently on one side than the other.  Over time these unconscious movements add up and create imbalances in our body which can sometimes lead to insidious aches pains or injuries.  One of my favorite stretches that can both expose imbalances from left to right and help restore some balance is the Banana Stretch.  Here’s a quick video tutorial! Hope you enjoy!

The Banana Stretch can also be performed in a door frame.

Movement Tip: The Dumbbell One-Arm Row

The Dumbbell One-Arm Row a staple movement for back workouts.  It’s one of the most common movements that I see when walking through a gym, and one of the most poorly performed.  Hopefully this post helps clean up some of the typical compensations that seem to occur with this exercise.

The dumbbell row is a go to exercise due to its simplicity.  But there’s a lot going on, and it’s not as easy as it looks.  To perform this movement correctly, there’s a ton of stability and core coordination that needs to take place.  I tend to see most people just focus on moving the weight, and completely forget about having a solid base.  The video below explains some of the important things to keep in mind throughout the entire movement to maximize its effectiveness and keep you safe.

Here are the key points to keep in mind while performing this movement.  Watch the video below for a full explanation and demonstration.

  • Think of keeping spine long and neutral from top of the head to tail bone
  • Fill up mid-back maintaining a supportive protraction of the shoulder blades
  • Keep space between the shoulders and ears
  • Shoulders and hips should be square with one another, don’t twist
  • Core should be engaged throughout the movement
  • Keep supporting foot flat
  • Initiate movement with a scapular retraction
  • Drive elbow up toward ceiling and pull toward your hip

Suggested Variables to Start:

2-3 sets with 60-90 seconds rest in between, 10-12 reps each side.  Take 1 second to pull up, pause for one second, slowly return to start position taking 3-4 seconds.